Jul 042011
 

Bahawalpur (also Bhawalpur, Bhawulpore) ( Urdu: بہاولپور ) is a city of ( 1998 pop. 403,408) located in Bahawalpur District, Punjab Pakistan. Bahawalpur is located south of the Sutlej River and it lies in the Cholistan region. It is situated 90 km from Multan, 420 km from Lahore and about 700 km from the national capital Islamabad. It was the capital of the former princely state of Bahawalpur. The city of Bahawalpur is famous for its kind-hearted people known as the Saraikis.

History

The city was founded in 1748 by Nawab Muhammad Bahawal Khan Abbasi I, whose descendants ruled the area until it joined Pakistan in 1947. The State of Bahawalpur was one of the largest states of British India, more than 450 kilometres long, and was ruled by General H.H. Jalalat ul-Mulk, Rukn ud-Daula, Saif ud-Daula, Hafiz ul-Mulk, Mukhlis ud-Daula wa Muin ud-Daula, Al-Haj Nawab Sir Sadiq Muhammad Khan Abbasi V Bahadur, Nusrat Jung, Amir of the God gifted kingdom of Bahawalpur, GCSI (1.1.1941, KCSI 1.3.1929), GCIE (3.6.1931), KCVO who decided to join Pakistan at the time of independence in 1947. The state maintained its sovereignty until 1955.

The Royal House of Bahawalpur is said to be of Arabic origin and claim descent from Abbas, progenitor of the Abbasid Caliphs of Baghdad and Cairo. Sultan Ahmad II, son of Shah Muzammil of Egypt left that country and arrived in Sind with a large following of Arabs ca. 1370. He married a daughter of Raja Rai Dhorang Sahta, receiving a third of the country I dowry. Amir Fathu’llah Khan Abbasi, is the recognized ancestor of the dynasty. He conquered the bhangar territory from Raja Dallu, of Alor and Bhamanabad, renaming it Qahir Bela. Amir Muhammad Chani Khan Abbasi entered the imperial service and gained appointment as a Panchhazari in 1583. At his death, the leadership of the tribe was contested between two branches of the family, the Daudputras and the Kalhoras. Amir Bahadur Khan Abbasi abandoned Tarai and settled near Bhakkar, founding the town of Shikarpur in 1690. Daud Khan, the first of his family to rule Bahawalpur, originated from Scind where he had opposed the Afghan Governor of that province and was forced to flee. The Nawab entered into Treaty relations with the HEIC, 22nd February 1833. The state acceded to the Dominion of Pakistan on 7th October 1947 and was merged into the state of West Pakistan on 14th October 1955.

Famous Families

There are so many famous & respectful families like Meer Family, Gardaizi Family, Jalwanah Family, Family of Siddique Muhammad khan ( www.umeedain.com) etc.

Meer Family

Meer Family of Meer Syed Muhammad Hussain Esq. of Rahim Yar Khan.

Meer Syed Muhammad Hussain Esq. had eight sons in which his elder most son Meer Syed Ghulam Muhammad Shah Esq. selected this city for his residence and died in 1976. He served as a Deputy Collector in Irrigation Department of Bahawal Pur State. His elder son Meer Syed Akhter Hussain Bokhari Esq. was also a Deputy Superintendent Jail Bahawal Pur and he was died in 2001. His 3rd son Meer Syed Zafar Hussain Bokhari Esq. was Principal at Govt. College of Commerce, Bahawal Pur. Now he is running his own private college in the name of Islamiah College of Commerce. His 4th son Meer Syed Asghar Hussain Bokhari Esq. was a best cricket player. He had gone to UK in 1956 with Pakistan Eaglets team and stayed there. Now he is a Councilor at Birmingham. His 5th and younger most son Meer Syed Afzal Hussain Bokhari Esq. was an Advocate as well as Secretary, Divisional Cricket Association Bahawal Pur. He was also a very good player of cricket. He died in 2005. The 2nd elder son of Meer Syed Muhammad Hussain Esq. was Meer Syed Tassaduq Hussain Esq. He was a Police Inspector and died in 1953. His elder son Meer Syed Aftab Hussain was a Doctor and he was migrated to UK and died there in 2004. The 4th son of Meer Syed Muhammad Hussain Esq. was Meer Syed Tajammul Hussain Esq. who was a Secretary of Rahim Yar Khan Municipal Committee. Then he was transferred to Bahawal Pur in the same capacity. The 7th son of Meer Syed Muhammad Hussain Esq. is Meer Syed Inayat Hussain Shah Esq. had served as Extra Additional Commissioner. He is still living there. His elder son Meer Syed Mujahid Hussain Shah is a Divisional Statical Officer. His younger son Meer Syed Shujaat Hussain is an Orthopedic Surgeon at B.V. Hospital.

Education

It also boasts a number of reputable educational establishments namely The Islamia University, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College and the Sadiq Public School, Bahawalpur, which is one of the biggest schools in Pakistan and whole of Asia. The weather is hot and dry. Summer temperatures reach high forties degrees Celsius. There is very little rainfall.

There are many colleges some are given below;

Government SE college Post Grduate college baghdad road Technology college Vocational colleges Four degree colleges Commerece college Tebiya Colleges Four elementary colleges for teaching training Wildlife

One of the few zoos in Pakistan is located in Bahawalpur. Located over an area of several acres inside the city, it contains a variety of animal species including asiatic lions, bengal tigers, hyenas, leopards, peacocks alongside a variety of other animals. Located near the city is the Lal Sohanra National Park, one of the few safaris in the country housing large animals including lions and rhinoceres.

Sites of interest Royal Family Palace: Noor Mahal Gerenal Noor Mahal (House of the Royal Family) Farid Gate Bahawlpur Museum Bahawlpur National Library Bahawalpur Zoo Mausoleums Channen Peer Tomb Mausoleums of Haugha Sahib Fort of Munde Shahid

The old fort of Munde Shahid, 50 km from Bahawalpur and Marot Fort are considered to be antiquities. A place outside the Marot Fort is known as ‘Baithak Maula Ali’. The tomb of Naugaza is located in the Munde Sharif Fort. The famous fort of Derawar is located near the city, being the private fort of the former royal family who continue to be major political players in Pakistan.

The Lal Sohanra National Park is also located close to the city. Architectural monuments include the former royal family’s palaces namely Darbar Mahal, Gulzar Mahal and Noor Mahal. All Mahals are now under military control.

Economy

Bahawalpur has only one railroad bridge over the Sutlej River, making it an important rail centre. The surrounding area is mostly agricultural, which allows agricultrual exports to many parts of the world. There is also a large market town for mangoes, dates, wheat, sugarcane, and cotton that bring in continuous demand all year round. In addition, it has soap making and cotton spinning factories, as well as enterprises producing silk and cotton textiles, carpets, and pottery. Bahwalpur has also sugar mill near a drive of 40 mins.

See also Punjab is Pakistan’s most fertile province, rich in both agriculture and ancient history. It’s also one of the more stable of the country’s regions, and travellers should have few of the problems that are faced further south and in the north. The prosperous and hospitable town of Bahawalpur is a gentle introduction to the area. From here you can journey into Cholistan – a sandy wasteland dotted with nomadic communities and wind-swept forts – or the Lal Suhanra National Park, an important wildlife reserve. Further north is Harappa which is, after Moenjodaro, the second most important site of the Indus Valley civilisation. Bahawalpur is the most southerly town in the Punjab. There are dialy flights from Islamabad about 555km (344mi) away. Most of the major destinations in the Punjab can be reached by bus, mini bus, and train.
Bahawalpur Bahawalpur is 899 km from Karachi. The founder of the state of Bahawalpur was Nawab Bahawal Khan Abbasi I. The Abbasi family ruled over the State for more than 200 years (1748 to 1954). during the rule of the last Nawab Sir Sadiq Muhammad Khan Abbasi V, Bahawalpur State was merged with Pakistan in 1954.  Bahawalpur was formerly the capital of the state and now is the District and Divisional Headquarters of Bahawalpur Division. It is an important marketing centre for the surrounding areas and is located on the cross roads between Peshawar, Lahore, Quetta and Karachi. Saraiki is the local language of the area. Urdu, Punjabi and English are also spoken and understood by most the people. There are three palaces, the main one Noor Mehal. Bahawalpur is also known for its distinctly embroiderd slippers and shoes and the filigree pottery which is made here. It has a marble mosque in the Fawara Chowk and a few British buildings like the Science College. Bahawalpur has a modest museum having a fine collection of coins, medals, postage stamps of former State of Bahawalpur, manuscripts, documents, inscriptions, wood carvings, camel skin paintings, historical models and stone carving etc. of Islamic and pre-Islamic period. The Cholistan desert zone and the cultural life of this area, forts, monuments, palaces, museum, zoo, stadium and a fine cricket ground in and around Bahawalpur are main attractions. Lal Suhanra National Park The Lal Suhanra National Park is ideal for recreation, education or research but shooting is forbidden. This park, 36 kms to the east of Bahawalpur, is a combination of a natural lake and a beautiful forest on 77480 acres of land on both sides of the Bahawal canal having watchtowers, catching ground, tourist huts, rest-houses, camping grounds and treks for the visitors and lovers of adventure. Hog deer, ravine deer, black buck and nilgai are common. Fox, jackals, hares, porcupines, mongoose, larks, owls and hawks are also found. Wild boars are in large number in the forest areas. Lal Suhanra National Park which is actually a wildlife sancturary worth a visit.

The Cholistan Desert

East of Bahawalpur is the Cholistan Desert which covers an area of about 15,000 square km and extends into the Thar Desert of India. The region was once watered by the Hakra River, known as the Saravati in vedic times. At one time there were 400 forts in the area and archaeological finds around the Darawar Fort, the only place with a perennial waterhole, indicate that it was contemporaneous with the Indus Valley Civilisation. The average annual rainfall is only 12 cm, and the little cultivation there is, is made possible by underground wells, drawn up by the camels. The water is stored in troughs, built by the tribes, between sandhills and din waterholes called tobas. The people are racially similar to those in Rajasthan – tall, with sharp features. They live in large, round, mud and grass huts, usually built on the top of sandhills. On the whole, they are pastoral and nomadic. The main tribes are the Chachar, Mehr, Lar, Paryar, Channar, Chandani and Bohar. The forts here were built at 29 km intervals, which probably served as guard posts for the camel caravan routes. There were three rows of these forts. the first line of forts began from Phulra and ended in Lera, the second from Rukhanpur to Islamgarh, and the third from Bilcaner to Kapoo. They are all in ruins now, and you can see that they were built with double walls of gypsum blocks and mud. Some of them date back to 1000 BC, and were destroyed and rebuilt many times.

Desert Jeep Rally.

The most interesting event held annually the month ot March is the Cholistan’s Desert Jeep Rally. it is held at famous Derawar Fort and vehicles covers the round about distance of 250 km. It includes the vehicles ranging from 1300 cc to 3000 cc plus. Thrillers gathers from all over the Pakistan to enjoy the spring in sand.

A city of good summer/winter sunshine. A lovely place to visit in winters. An international level and free sports facility and library. A safari park and loads of rustic life on show.

This city also offers a Zoo which is one of its kind. it has a big population of lions,  including Bengal tigers.

Bahawalpur is small and its easy to find your way around the town. Its a nice place to spend a few days if you are tired from being in big cities like Lahore and Multan, or tired of being in the middle of nowhere in Cholistan.  The central bazar still feels quite historical, although a bit ramshackle.  The Cantt area is nice and relatively green.

Bahawalpur City, is located in southeastern Punjab province, Pakistan. Bahawalpur is 889 kms from Karachi.

Saraiki is the local language of the area. Urdu, Punjabi and English are also spoken and understood by most of the people.
Bahawalpur originally was a vassal of the great Sikh empire built by Maharajah Ranjeet Singh. In 1936 Bahawalpur stopped paying tribute and openly declared independence. In the Anglo Sikh wars Bahawalpur supported the British and this gurantedd its survival.The founder of the

State of Bahawalpur was Nawab Bahawal Khan Abbasi I. The Abbasi family ruled over the State for more than 200 years (1748 to 1954). During the rule of the last Nawab Sir Sadiq Muhammad Khan Abbasi V, Bahawalpur State was merged with Pakistan. During the 1960′s (1954) the Nawab agreed (Agreement Dated 3rd October, 1947) for Bahawalpur to be absorbed into modern Pakistan. He was however given special priveledges including the right to import several cars duty free each year. Bahawalpur was formerly the capital of the state and now is the District and Divisional Headquarters of Bahawalpur Division.
The Nawabs of Bahawalpur originally came from Sindh; they formed a princely state and assumed independence in 1802.

The City, which lies just south of the Sutlej River, was founded in 1748 by Muhammad Bahawal Khan and was incorporated as a municipality in 1874. It is the site of the Adamwahan (Empress) Bridge, the only Railway Bridge over the Sutlej River in Pakistan, and has rail links with Peshawar and Karachi.

The region surrounding Bahawalpur to the west, called the Sindh, is a fertile alluvial tract in the Sutlej River valley that is irrigated by floodwaters, planted with groves of date palms, and thickly populated. The chief crops are wheat, gram, cotton, sugarcane, and dates. Sheep and cattle are raised for export of wool and hides. East of Bahawalpur is the Pat, or Bar, a tract of land considerably higher than the adjoining valley. It is chiefly desert irrigated by the Sutlej inundation canals and yields crops of wheat, cotton, and sugarcane. Farther east, the Rohi, or Cholistan, is a barren desert tract, bounded on the north and west by the Hakra depression with mound ruins of old settlements along its high banks; it is still inhabited by nomads. The principal inhabitants of the region surrounding Bahawalpur are Jat and Baluchi peoples. There are many historical sites in the area, including Uch, southwest of Bahawalpur, an ancient town dating from Indo-Scythian (Yüeh-chih) settlement (c. 128 BC to AD 450). Pop. (1981) City, 180,263; (1981 prelim.) metropolitan area, 695,000.

Bahawalpur is also an important agricultural training and educational center. Soapmaking and cotton ginning are important enterprises; cotton, silk, embroidery, carpets, and extraordinarily delicate pottery are produced. Factories producing cottonseed oil and cottonseed cake were built in the 1970s. It is an important marketing center for the surrounding areas and is located on the crossroads between Peshawar, Lahore, Quetta and Karachi. Bahawalpur is also known for its distinctly embroidered slippers and shoes and the filigree pottery which is made here.

The City is located favorably for commerce, lying at the junction of trade routes from the east, south-east, and south. It is a center for trade in wheat, cotton, millet, and rice grown in the surrounding region. Dates and mangoes are also grown here. Canals supply water for irrigation. The principal industries are cotton ginning, rice and flour milling, and the handweaving of textiles.

Sutlej (Chinese, Langqên Zangbo or Xiangquan He; Indian, Satlej), chief tributary of the Indus River. It rises in Tibet, flows south-west through Himachal Pradesh State, India, and then passes through the great arid plains of Punjab Province, Pakistan, joining the Indus after a course of about 1,450 km (900 mi.). The Sutlej is the south-easternmost of the five rivers of the Punjab, the other four being its two main tributaries, the Beâs and the Chenab, together with two branches of the latter. Below the confluence of the Beâs, the river is sometimes called the Ghara, and its lowest course, after receiving the Chenab, is called the Panjnad (“five rivers”).

Rulers of Bahawalpur

The rulers were sindhi abbasids of shikarpur and sukkur who captured thses areas.Because of this fact,people of upper sindh which afterwords became state bahawalpur did not dislike the rulers.They took the title of Amir until 1740, when the title changed to Nawab Amir. Although the title was abolished in 1955, the current head of the House of Bahawalpur ( Sallah ud-din Muhammad Khan) uses the title informally. From 1942, the Nawabs were assisted by Prime Ministers.

ABBAS NAGAR

Abbas Nagar is an important QASBA(Village) of Bahawalpur district. It is located on Bahawalpur, Bahawal Nagar road at 25KM from Bahawalpur. main crops of Abbas Nagar are Cotton,Wheat and Sugar Cane.The population of the QASBA is 15000 (Appro as per Govt. in 2004).

Tenure Nawab Amir of Bahawalpur 1690 – 1702 Bahadur Khan II 1702 – 1723 Mobarak Khan I 1723 – 11 April 1746 Sadeq Mohammad Khan I 11 April 1746 – 12 June 1750 Mohammad Bahawal Khan I 12 June 1750 – 4 June 1772 Mobarak Khan II 4 June 1772 – 13 August 1809 Mohammad Bahawal Khan II 13 August 1809 – 17 April 1826 Sadeq Mohammad Khan II 17 April 1826 – 19 October 1852 Mohammad Bahawal Khan III 19 October 1852 – 20 February 1853 Sadeq Mohammad Khan III 20 February 1853 – 3 October 1858 Fath Mohammad Khan 3 October 1858 – 25 March 1866 Mohammad Bahawal Khan IV 25 March 1866 – 14 February 1899 Sadeq Mohammad Khan IV 14 February 1899 – 15 February 1907 Mohammad Bahawal Khan V 15 February 1907 – 14 October 1955 Sadeq Mohammad Khan V 14 October 1955 State of Bahawalpur abolished Tenure

Prime Minister of Bahawalpur 1942 – 1947 Sir Richard Marsh Crofton 1948 – 1952 John Dring 1952 – 14 October 1955 A.R. Khan 14 October 1955 State of Bahawalpur abolished

WORTH SITE IN BAHAWAL PUR

Cholistan

Farther east, the Rohi, or Cholistan, is a barren desert tract, bounded on the north and west by the Hakra depression with ruins of old settlements along its high banks; it is still inhabited by nomads. It is at a distance of 30 km. from Bahawalpur. The word ‘Cholistan’ is derived from the word ‘cholna’ which means moving.

It covers an area of about 16,000 square km and extends into the Thar Desert of India. The region was once watered by the Hakra River, known as the Saravati in vedic times.

At one time there were 400 forts in the area and archaeological finds around the Darawar Fort, the only place with a perennial waterhole.

The average annual rainfall is only 12 cm, and the little cultivation is made possible by underground wells, drawn up by the camels. The water is stored in troughs, built by the tribes, between sandhills and din waterholes called tobas.

The forts here were built at 29 km intervals, which probably served as guard posts for the camel caravan routes. There were three rows of these forts. the first line of forts began from Phulra and ended in Lera, the second from Rukhanpur to Islamgarh, and the third from Bilcaner to Kapoo. They are all in ruins now, and you can see that they were built with double walls of gypsum blocks and mud. Some of them date back to 1000 BC, and were destroyed and rebuilt many times. Cholistan also boasts of many old forts such as Derawar,Vingrot, Banwar, Marcot, Wilhar, Maujgharh, Mao, Phuira and Din-gharh etc.

Derawar Mosque

Also worth visiting is the Derawar Mosque, which is 100 years old and is built with white marble stone. The Derawar mosque of marble is a thing of beauty, an exact replica of the Moti Masjid of the Red Fort of Delhi.

Noor Mahal

A beautiful palace built like a Italian chateau on neoclassical lines, strangely at a time when modernism had set in. Built in 1872, there are diverse stories doing the rounds regarding its construction. According to one belief, Nawab Sadiq Muhammad Khan IV had the palace made for his wife. However, she was there for one night, only as she happened to see the adjoining graveyard from her balcony, and refused to spend another night there. As the story goes, it remained unused during his reign. The Noor Mahal located in Cantt and in the jurisdiction of Pakistan Army.

Channan Pir

From Bahawalpur at a distance of 1 hour drive is Channan Pir in Cholistan desert. Channan Pir is a shrine of a Muslim saint, which lies in the desert between Derawar and Din Gargh Forts.

Burial Ground

Another interesting place worth visiting here is the Nawab Family burial ground where many of the old Nawabs and their families are buried. The tomb here is attractive, built with marble and decorated with blue glazed style.

Uch Sharif

Uch Sharif, 75 km from Bahawalpur is a very old town. It is believed that it came into existence way back in 500 BC. Some historians believe that Uch was there even before the advent of Bikramajit when Jains and Buddhist ruled over the sub-continent. At the time of the invasion by Alexander the Great, Uch was under Hindu rule.

The surviving shrines, sanctuaries, cemeteries, and mausoleums, including the Bibi Jawandi tomb, incorporate glazed tile and brick revetments, lime plaster panels, terra-cotta embellishments, brick structural walls laid in earth mortars, and ingenious corner tower buttresses. The famous shrines existing at Uch include those of Hazrat Bahawal Haleem, Hazrat Jalaluddin Surkh Bukhari, Makhdoom Jahanian Jahangasht, Shaikh Saifuddin Ghazrooni and Bibi Jawanadi. The shrine of Bibi Jawandi is a Central Asian design, titled in the blue and white faience.

Uch is a small town today and divided into three different quarters known as:

(i) Uch Bukhari, after Hazrat Syed Jalaluddin Bukhari Surkhposh
(ii) Uch Jilani, after the name of Hazrat Shaikh Mohammad Ghaus Qadri Jilani (Bandagi), who came from Halab in 887 AH
(iii) Uch Mughlan after the Mughal rulers.

Mosque at Bhong

Bhong Mosque is in the Rahim Yar Khan district and is about 200 km from Bahawalpur. This mosque was built by Rais Ghazi, a local landlord of Bhong. Gold leaves have been used for the intricate decorative work in the mosque which has made it famous. It is a site worth visiting for its beauty and the stylish calligraphic work.

Lal Suhanra National Park

This park is ideal for recreation, education or research but shooting is forbidden. This park, 36 km to the east of Bahawalpur is a combination of a natural lake and forest. It covers an area of 77,480 acres of land and is spread over on both sides of Bahawalpur canal. It has watch-towers, catching ground, tourist huts, rest house, camping grounds, TDCP Resort and treks for the visitors and lovers of nature. Hog deer, ravine deer, black buck and nilgai are common. Fox, jackals, hares, porcupines, mongoose, larks, owls and hawks are also found. Wild boars are in large number in the forest areas.

Sadiq Garh Palace

In Ahmadpur East is situated another palace called Sadiq Garh Palace. It is in the use of the ex-royal family’s descendants. This palace can be termed as the prettiest of the other palaces and is embellished with most delicate and intricate paintings. It displays chandeliers and a collection of carpets, coming from all over the world, apart from armaments of European and Asian make and a number of other gifts that must have been showered on the ex-royal family of Bahawalpur from time to time.

Dera Nawab Sahib

The palaces of the Amirs are located mainly in Dera Nawab Saheb at a distance of 22 miles from Bahawalpur; while, Derawar was the ancestral seat of the rulers of Bahawalpur. It is the gateway to Cholistan, which comprises 1,000 square miles.

Panjnad Head Works

Panjnad is located 12 km. away from Uch Sharif where all the five rivers of Punjab meet. It is a nice picnic spot with scenic beauty.

Forts

The old fort of Munde Shahid, 50 km. from Bahawalpur and Marot Fort are considered to be antiquities. A place outside the Marot Fort is known as ‘Baithuk Maula Ali’. The tomb of ‘Naugaza’ is located in the Munde Shahid Fort.
Islam Garh Fort

Islam Garh ,the old Bhinwar Fort, was built by Rawal Bhim Singh in Samabat in 1665, as the following inscription on its gate in Babri character proves “Samabat 1665 Asuj Wadi 2, Maharaj Rawal Siri Bhim Singh ji Maharaj”. The Fort is situated in the Cholistan area of Tehsil Khanpur. It is 46 kilometers south east of Baghla Fort. The fort is in a dilapidated state.

Mau Bubarik Fort

According to Tarikh-e-Murad, a fort was built by Raj Hans Karar in Mau Mubarik as a residence for his mother, hence the name Mau refers to mother in local language. The fort was taken by Shah Arghun in 1525 A.D. It was one of the six fortresses of Raj Sahasi 11. It had 20 bastions and Towers. The ramparts were about 549 meters in circumference and the walls very strongly and thickly built. Here the shrine of a saint Sheikh Hakim is of great importance.

Some Shrines

Other shrines of Bahawalpur region are that of

» Khawaja Noor Muhammad known as Qibla-e-Alam at Chistian
» Shrine of another saint at Chachran
» Shrine of Hazrat Mohkam Din known as ‘Sahib-us-Sair’ (great traveler) at Khanqah Sharif, 20 km. from Bahawalpur.

Pattan Minara

8 km. east of Rahim Yar Khan railway station is an extensive site of ruins known as ‘Pattan Minara’. There is a tower in the center of four smaller towers at this place, which are believed to have been a Buddhist Monastery.

The ruins of Pattan Minara are located at a distance of about 8 kilometers in east south of Rahim Yar Khan city. It has variously been described as the remains of Asahoka period, who built it in 250 B.C. or a Buddhist monastery. Nearby the minar, remains of a fort, a mosque and some tunnels are also visible. About 110 years ago Colonel Minchin a political agent of Ex-Bahawalpur state started the excavation of these tunnels but discontiued digging for some reasons or other. According to Colonel Toy it was the capital of the Hindu kingdom in 10 A.D. In the mid of the 18th century A.D. Fazal Elahi Khan Halani a Daupauta chief destroyed it and used its materials in the construction of Baghla and Dingar Fort.

Bhutta Wahan

It is 15 km. from Rahim Yar Khan. It is believed to be the birthplace of ‘Sassi’, one of the legendary lovers. Also it is believd to be the birthplace of ‘Abu-ul-Fazal and Faizi’, the sons of Mullah Mubarak and famous courtiers of Akbar the Great. But nobody knows the exact history of this place precisely.

Musafir Khana

It is at a distance of 30 km. from Bahawalpur. There are seven tombs known as ‘Ali Ashab’. These tombs are said to be of the companions of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). A fair is held in the village in the month of May (Jeth) and on Fridays in the month of June (Har).

Wildlife

Hog deer, ravine deer, black buck and blue bull are common. Fox, jackals, hares, porcupines, mongoose, arks, owls and hawks are also found. Wild boars are found in large numbers in the forest areas.
Specialities of Bahawalpur

Bahawalpur is known for its cotton, silk, embroidery, carpets, and extraordinarily delicate pottery, which is produced here.

The Punjab Small Industries Corporation (PSIC) has established a Craft Development Center for Cholistan area, outside Farid Gate, Bahawalpur from where handicrafts manufactured in Cholistan can be purchased.

Flassi

It is a piece of 4-ft * 7-ftsize, made of camel hair and cotton yarn. It is used for wall hanging, as a decoration piece and a carpet.

Gindi or Rilli

It is made of small pieces of many colors of cotton cloth and needle work. It can be used as wall hangings, bed covers, carpets and blankets.

Changaries

Like big plaques, these are made of palm leaves in different bright colors with beautiful patterns and geometric designs. These are used for keeping the ‘chapattis’ and also as a wall decoration.

Khalti

It is like a purse embroidered on top with multi colored threads.

Aart Work

It is an attractive type of embroidery done on dupatta, kurta and chaddar etc.
Bazaars of Bahawalpur

The main shopping centers of Bahawalpur are Shahi Bazaar, Machli Bazaar, Farid Gate and the Mall.

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